ARCHIVED - NAV CANADA 2007-2008

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  Report Card 2007–2008
NAV Canada

Factors and Criteria

Summary of Substantiating Data

Rating

Management (15%)

(a) An accountability framework, an action plan and accountability mechanisms are in place (5%)

Note: The core business of NAV CANADA is the provision of air navigation services to the aviation community, including air traffic control, flight information, weather briefings, flight planning, flight advisory services, and other support such as aeronautical information. These services are provided bilingually throughout Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR), in accordance with the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs). The provision of these services is subject to regulation by Transport Canada, which regularly conducts audits and inspections of NAV CANADA facilities and operations.

An OL accountability framework exists. The policy manual sets out NAV CANADA’s commitment to, and general policy on, official languages (OL). It describes the responsibilities of the Chief Executive Officer and the Executive Management Committee (EMC) for OL. The document, however, does not mention the co-champions or the person responsible for the implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act (the Act). The Manager’s Handbook and the Employee’s Handbook set out the respective responsibilities of managers and employees regarding service to the public, language of work and equitable participation, as well as administrative procedures (e.g. staffing of bilingual positions, and complaints from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL). Part VII of the Act has now been included in both the Manager’s Handbook and the Employee’s Handbook and contains specific references to the requirement to take “positive measures” in carrying out its responsibilities under Part VII.  These documents are posted on the intranet and available to all employees.

The 2005–2008 OL Action Plan has been updated and replaced with the NAV CANADA Official Languages Annual Report Card Performance Improvement Plan with objectives, dates, and the responsible “office of primary involvement” (OPI) identified.  It was developed in conjunction with the managers who are responsible for implementing it, was discussed and was approved by the Executive Management Committee, and distributed to responsible managers. The Plan is being followed and includes specific actions to address the organization’s previous Report Card performance challenges.

Mechanisms exist to measure the extent to which the OL Action Plan’s objectives are being met. For example, where elements of the Action Plan are included in managers’ annual performance objectives, payment of the annual bonus and performance assessment are affected by progress made against the OL Plan. More generally, every year all managers are reminded of OL during the annual signing of the NAV CANADA Code of Conduct, which specifically includes OL.  A structured review of NAV CANADA’s new Official Languages Annual Report Card Performance Improvement Plan takes place on a regular basis. The continued ability to meet the bilingual requirements of their position is part of the annual performance review assessment of operational employees such as air traffic controllers in bilingual positions. 

A

(b) Visibility of official languages in the organization (5%)

NAV CANADA is a private-sector monopoly that generates its own revenue. NAV CANADA’s overarching official languages objectives are now mentioned in key strategic documents, such as the 2007–2009 Business Plan and the Operations Strategic Plan 2007–2008. The 2006 Annual Report included information on NAV CANADA’s internal language complaints process as part of its feature on ethical business conduct. 

NAV CANADA has included official languages in its quarterly internal management questionnaire and representation process, involving approximately 90 members of the organization’s senior management, as part of the new obligations created under the Canadian Securities Administrators Regulation. Under this process, individual areas of responsibility within the organization are required to disclose issues that may pose risk to the organizations, including specifically official languages issues. This provides all business units with the opportunity to bring potential official languages risks to the attention of the organization’s Executive Management Committee for attention and corrective action. In addition, a unit evaluation process takes place every three years where each unit is audited, including the use of OL.

The EMC discusses OL approximately three times a year. The Champion is the Director of Communications and is a member of the EMC.  To further enhance the profile of official languages within the organization, NAV CANADA has recently appointed an Official Languages Co-champion, the Assistant Vice-President, Operational Support, who will be working in partnership with NAV CANADA’s other OL Champion to further official languages within the organization.  NAV CANADA’s official languages co-champions have started a column in NAV CANADA’s internal newspaper, the NAV CANADA News, which will regularly feature articles on important official languages topics throughout the year. 

This column first appeared in the November 2007 edition of the NAV CANADA News and included an announcement of the appointment of the new Official Languages Co-Champion and featured an article on active offer to further enhance employees’ awareness of the obligation to actively offer bilingual services and some tips on how to do so.  Included in this column is the announcement of a newly created Official Languages Inbox, regularly monitored by the Legislated Programs team, to signal the importance of official languages within the organization and to provide employees with a convenient means by which to submit any official language questions or concerns they may have.

The Assistant Vice-President of Human Resources is in charge of OL matters and there is a good dialogue between him and the manager responsible for NAV CANADA’s Official Languages Program, who reports to him.  Regularly scheduled bi-weekly meetings are held, in which official languages is one of three standing agenda items.  As well, he (the Assistant Vice-President of Human Resources) accompanies his Vice-President to meetings that deal specifically with OL. The Champion is kept apprised of significant OL issues on a regular basis.  Active lines of communication are maintained between the OL manager, the Assistant Vice-President of Human Resources and the OL Co-champions. 

A

(c) Complaints and follow-up (5%)

NAV CANADA’s OL complaint resolution process appears to be effective—complaints are dealt with quickly, the responsible manager is involved and specific complaints do not repeat.  Indeed, OCOL no longer receives many complaints about NAV CANADA.

Because NAV Canada now gets so few complaints they are all brought to the attention of the OL Co-champions, the Assistant Vice-President, Human Resources and the Vice-President, Human Resources.  The complaints are then shared by the Vice-President, Human Resources with EMC to prevent the re-occurrence of similar issues in the future.

A

Subtotal:

A

Service to the public—Part IV (25%)

(a) Bilingual services advertised to the public and sufficient bilingual staff (3%)

NAV CANADA’s bilingual points of service are listed on the Burolis Web site. Also, NAV CANADA’s bilingual Web site lists a series of  1-800 numbers where callers can get weather briefings in both languages. A list of its main headquarters and Ottawa-based services appears in both languages in the Ottawa-Gatineau white pages.

NAV CANADA regularly uses media to communicate with the public in the official language of its choice. 

However, the organization’s use of media is typically limited to recruitment advertising and mandatory notices in which advertising space is purchased in both the majority language press and the minority language press to ensure that members of both official languages groups, including minority language communities, are reached in an equitable fashion.

NAV CANADA is now able to provide complete information about the linguistic capabilities of employees who serve the public.  As of the last reporting period, ending December 31, 2006, NAV CANADA has a total of 555 bilingual positions providing services to the public, of which 537 or 97% meet the language requirements of their positions (Source: NAV CANADA HR system, March 31, 2007).

B

(b) Observations on active offer and service delivery
(15%)

According to observations of in-person service made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2007, an active visual offer was present in 100% of cases; an active offer by staff was made in 50% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 100% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2007, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 50% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 100% of cases.

B

(c) The service agreements delivered by third parties or in partnership provide for the delivery of bilingual services (2%)

NAV CANADA has a central Contracting and Procurement unit exclusively responsible for the preparation of all contracts.  In the interest of strengthening its position on official languages with its third party service providers, the organization has recently amended and made its official languages clause more specific. 

NAV CANADA has very limited use of third parties in the direct provision of its service to the public, namely in the provision of air traffic and advisory services. This limited use is related to the delivery of weather services by Meteorological Services of Canada, a part of Environment Canada. As this is a department of the Government of Canada and is subject to the same regulations regarding communications with and services to the public, Meteorological Services of Canada respects NAV CANADA’s linguistic obligations regarding the provision of bilingual services to the public from its bilingual service points.

The Corporation does have contracts with private sector organizations for the provision of some services to its employees (i.e. employee assistance programs, disability management program and others). Such services are made available in the language of choice for NAV CANADA employees. Led by the Legislated Programs team, NAV CANADA now has a specific central Official Languages Audit Plan for its third party service providers to ensure that its contractors provide an adequate level of bilingual services, where required. These audit activities are to be carried out regularly every 6 months, with any compliance issues being reported to Contracting and Procurement to facilitate a quick and effective resolution of the issues.  Contract compliance issues that are identified directly by users will also continue to be reported to Contracting and Procurement for quick resolution.

B

(d) Policy on service to the public and bilingual services quality monitoring (5%)

Note: The Treasury Board’s official language regulations exempt air traffic control service points outside the National Capital Region (NCR) and the province of Quebec from the Act’s general requirement to offer service in a bilingual manner at locations where there is significant demand for bilingual service.  For this reason, NAV CANADA does not have any points of service offering service in both languages to pilots outside the province of Quebec or the NCR.

Both the OL Guidelines for Employees and the OL Guidelines for Managers contain a policy statement on customer service for the National Capital Region and in bilingual offices. These documents support NAV CANADA’s commitment to the equal status of Canada’s two official languages.

For the most part NAV CANADA employees do not provide service to the general public. Currently controllers and flight service specialists hired for bilingual positions are tested for language proficiency by third party language assessors when they are hired.

The provision of service to pilots from designated bilingual operational sites is subject to several continual controls. The provision of bilingual air traffic control and related advisory services is subject to regulation by Transport Canada, which regularly conducts audits and inspections of NAV CANADA facilities and operations.

Additionally, ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the language competency of NAV CANADA’s operational personnel is conducted namely in the form of an “over the shoulder evaluation” which occurs twice a year. These requirements help ensure that NAV CANADA continues to meet its public service obligations under the Official Languages Act. Moreover, NAV CANADA managers and supervisors providing or overseeing the provision of bilingual service must be capable of providing supervision and direction in English and French.
 
For non-operational personnel working in NAV CANADA’s Head Office in areas such as Customer Relations, Corporate Communications or at the NAV CANADA Training Institute, where there may be contact with the public, NAV CANADA’s OL Guidelines for Employees and OL Guidelines for Managers contain a clear policy statement on offering client service in both official languages, including information on how to actively offer bilingual services. Both these policy documents are available online to all employees via NAV CANADA’s portal.  This information is also included in newly introduced training sessions offered to new employees through the Human Resources Managers’course and the Business of NAV CANADA course.

NAV CANADA closely monitors its performance with regards to the provision of services to the public using a variety of sources, including its regulator, Transport Canada, its customers through the Commercial Relations group, its internal official languages complaints process, media coverage and any issues brought forward with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

B

Subtotal: 

B

Language of work—Part V (25%)

(a) Language of work regime and adequate bilingual supervision (12.5%)

Note: NAV CANADA is committed to ensuring respect for the language rights of its employees, clients, and all those with whom it does business. NAV CANADA follows the designation of bilingual regions in the matter of language of work as stipulated in the Official Languages Act.

The Manager’s Handbook and Employee’s Handbookset out the Corporation’s policy on language of work in bilingual regions. Among other things that policy states that: (i) widely used work instruments; (ii) supervision of incumbents of bilingual positions; and (iii) professional training and development must be available in the employee’s language of choice in offices that have been designated bilingual for purposes of language of work.  These two documents also specify rights and obligations with respect to central and personal services, computer systems, and the important role the language used during meetings plays in the creation of an environment where English and French are effective languages of work.

As part of the standard information gathered from new employees, NAV CANADA asks its new employees to provide their preferred official language of correspondence.

A significant project was undertaken recently to upgrade NAV CANADA’s bilingual terminology database, Terminav©.  This database was originally designed by NAV CANADA’s Translation and Terminology Services and released in December of 2002.  Given NAV CANADA’s obligations under the Official Languages Act, in addition to its primary role in the provision of safe and efficient air navigation services, this tool facilitates the use of accurate and distinct vocabulary to promote clear communication within the organization and with the public, which, in turn, impacts safety as a whole.

To emphasize the importance of language training, NAV CANADA’s EMC has recently expressed its support for a new centralized language training fund. This infusion will result in increased language training opportunities for NAV CANADA employees and managers. The LEAD Program offers language training to some candidates in order to address the linguistic proficiency requirements of NAV CANADA’s future leaders.

NAV CANADA’s Legislated Programs and Communications teams are presently working on the development of a Lunchtime Language Café. This initiative will be available as a second language retention and improvement opportunity for employees and managers.

NAV CANADA does not yet have the full capacity to electronically capture information about the linguistic capabilities of managers who supervise employees in bilingual positions in bilingual regions but they are working on developing such a capacity. Only partial information was available by December 2007, with full functionality for all the data fields anticipated by September 1, 2008.

In the meantime, NAV CANADA has completed a high-level position language profile review for 40% of bilingual positions and assembled information regarding the individual’s associated ability to provide bilingual supervision.  NAV CANADA has completed detailed position language profile reviews for all positions, including both supervisory and non-supervisory positions, located in North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins, Saint John, and Fredericton.   They have commenced detailed work on supervisory and non-supervisory positions located in Dorval and Mirabel.

C

(b) Use of each official language in the workplace (12.5%)

NAV CANADA is presently undertaking new initiatives to remind managers of the need to create a workplace that is conducive to the use of both official languages and remind employees to use their preferred OL in the workplace.

Led by its official languages co-champions, NAV CANADA has been developing an official languages visibility campaign plan with the primary objective of increasing overall communication about official languages across the organization.  NAV CANADA plans to incorporate some of the Canada Public Service Agency’s Official Languages: A Winning Formula marketing materials into its Official Languages Visibility Campaign.

As part of this Plan, NAV CANADA’s official languages co-champions have initiated a column in NAV CANADA’s internal newspaper, the NAV CANADA News that will regularly feature articles on important official languages topics throughout the year.  This column first appeared in the November 2007 edition of the NAV CANADA News and included an announcement of the appointment of the new official languages co-champion and featured an article on active offer to further enhance employees’ awareness of the obligation to actively offer bilingual services and some tips on how to do so.

Included in this column is the announcement of the Official Languages Inbox, regularly monitored by the Legislated Programs team, to increase the profile of official languages within the organization and to provide employees with a convenient means by which to submit any official language questions or concerns they may have.

The most important components of the official languages education initiative are the official languages modules of the Human Resources Managers’ course for new and existing managers and the Business of NAV CANADA course for new employees.

NAV CANADA’s Official Languages Guidelines for Managers includes a manager’s checklist as a reminder of how to create work environments conducive to the effective use of both official languages. Managers are reminded as well of their obligations regarding OL through the newsletter, their annual signing of the Code of Conduct and whenever language of work issues arise.

Additionally, NAV CANADA’s Official Languages Guidelines forEmployeesacts as a reminder to employees, encouraging them to use the official language of their choice in the workplace.

NAV CANADA’s EMC recently conducted a meeting on the topic of official languages simultaneously in both official languages for the first time.  The members of NAV CANADA’s EMC have committed to continuing this practice on a bi-annual basis. The Corporation also provides interpretation service at its annual general meetings and at senior managers’ meetings, where required.

Although NAV CANADA itself has not yet conducted any employee satisfaction surveys, audits or special reports on the subject of Official Languages, they did participate in the Commissioner of Official Languages’ survey conducted in 2007 by Statistics Canada on the subject of employees’ ability to use their preferred official language in the workplace.  Additionally, NAV CANADA now has plans to include official languages questions in its regularly scheduled Employee Engagement Survey for the first time in June of 2008 in order to gather information directly from its employees regarding the organization’s official languages performance and employee satisfaction.

The survey conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of OCOL showed that overall 47% of Francophone respondents in the NCR, New Brunswick, and in bilingual regions of Ontario, "strongly agree" or "mostly agree" with the language of work regime.  In Quebec, 77% of Anglophone respondents "strongly agree" or "mostly agree" with the language of work regime.

D

Subtotal: 

C

Equitable participationPart VI (10%)

(a) Percentage of Francophone participation throughout Canada (5%)

Overall, the workforce is 18.1% Francophone (Source: OLIS II, December 31, 2007).

A

(b) Percentage of Anglophone participation in Quebec (5%)

In Quebec, the workforce is 8.1% Anglophone (Source: OLIS II, December 31, 2007).

B

Subtotal: 

B

Development of official language minority communities and promotion of linguistic duality—Part VII (25%)

 

NAV CANADA does not produce memoranda to Cabinet or Treasury Board submissions. The Corporation is not a government agency or a Crown corporation. It is a private-sector monopoly with a stakeholder board of directors.  Nonetheless, when there is a change in the level or kind of service offered to a local community, such as happened recently with the flight service stations in Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Roberval, Quebec, the Corporation’s representatives meet with local commercial clients and other aviation-related stakeholders, to discuss the change. Meetings are conducted in a bilingual format as required by the customer/stakeholder group.  Official language minority communities (OLMC) representatives are not specifically targeted, but members of minority language communities are in most cases included in the forums.
 
In April 2006 both the EMC and the Board of Directors were briefed on the November 2005 changes to the Act.  In 2007, NAV CANADA’s new Official Languages Annual Report Card Performance Improvement Plan was approved by the EMC and includes a specific section to address the ongoing challenges faced by the organization with regards to Part VII of the Act.
 
NAV CANADA has identified 2 key individuals (one representing Human Resources and one representing Communications) who will be responsible for contact with OLMCs and the identification of “positive measures” to promote those OLMCs. These 2 individuals report to and work closely with the Manager Responsible for Official Languages and one of the co-champions.

The Planincludes specific “positive measures” consisting of ensuring continued minority language press advertising; informing local minority language associations of job competitions open to the public; carrying out outreach activities to OLMCs in recruitment initiatives in partnership with minority language associations; supporting transferred or newly hired employees who are members of a  minority language group by offering them an information kit on local minority language schools, community associations, scouts, guides and other children’s associations, libraries, bookstores, theatre companies, etc.; providing employees with information about minority language events and productions through NAV CANADA’s intranet; and including references, images and sites representing minority language communities in communications materials, etc.

To raise awareness among all employees of the organization’s obligations under Part VII and the need to take “positive measures” to promote OLMCs, information on Part VII has now been included in NAV CANADA’s Human Resources Managers' course materials and Part VII has also been included in NAV CANADA’s Official Languages Guidelines for Managers and its Official Languages Guidelines for Employees.

(a) Development of official language minority communities (12.5%)

 

NAV CANADA takes steps to assist OLMCs and promote linguistic duality through its recently expanded minority language sponsorship program assisting aviation industry groups such as l’Association québecoise des transporteurs aériens, in addition to minority language events like the Townshippers’ Awards.

Some of NAV CANADA’s current plans include continuing and expanding sponsorship of minority language events, inviting artists from minority language communities (i.e. musicians, singers, dancers, theatre troupes) to perform at President’s and Chairman’s Awards events, and offering site tours to minority language communities and minority language schools.

C

(b) Promotion of linguistic duality (12.5%)

For the first time, NAV CANADA is providing full corporate sponsorship of the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie.  NAV CANADA continues to look at ways to expand this program in keeping with their role as an essential service provider to the aviation community. 

As a result of recent work, 15 minority language partnership and sponsorship opportunities have been identified and are currently under consideration for sponsorships this fiscal year.  NAV CANADA continues to research other opportunities to take “positive measures” to promote linguistic duality.

C

Subtotal: 

C

OVERALL RATING

C